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What is Mentorship?

Mentorship is the process where an experienced worker (mentor) works with and educates a less experienced worker (apprentice) to help foster skill development and professional growth. The mentor shares his/her skills, knowledge, techniques, best practices and experience to provide a comprehensive hands-on training experience for the apprentice.

Employer Benefits

Journey-person Benefits

Apprentice Benefits

Automotive Mentorship Process

Click on the steps below to see how to begin a mentorship program in your business.

Step 1 - Identify Mentorship as a Priority

As a company, decide that mentorship is a priority for employee development. Promote mentoring in your workplace and create a learning culture of sharing best practices, skills and knowledge.

Step 2 - Select Mentor (s)

Identify potential and interested mentors for each automotive service area i.e. Parts, Service Counter, Shop Floor, etc. Conduct an Automotive Mentor Profile (administered by the ASC) to better understand their learning style, behavioural attributes and how they compare to the industry mentor benchmark.

Step 3 - Encourage Mentorship Training

Contact the Apprenticeship Training and Skill Development Division to arrange mentorship training. Courses are offered face-to-face, online, through distance education and at the workplace.

Step 4 - Create Mentor/Apprentice Team(s)

Match your mentor and apprentice based on best fit, personalities and interests.

Step 5 - Mentorship Orientation Meeting

The employer, mentor and apprentice meet to review roles and responsibilities, training schedule and apprentice career goals. Review ‘What-if’ scenarios, for successes and setbacks. Establish how much time will be designated for training.

Step 6 - Ensure Workplace Training

Create opportunities for the apprentice to apply their new theoretical learning. Refer to the annual apprenticeship training schedule to identify key dates. The apprenticeship program is divided into 85% on the job training and 15% in-class learning.

Step 7 - Conduct Performance Evaluation Reviews

As you implement a new program, it is essential to provide feedback to the mentor and apprentice on a regular basis. The key to successful performance evaluations is to keep the review positive. While the person may receive a moderate score, the employer should discuss ways to improve performance and avoid focusing on weaknesses.

Step 8 - Wrap-Up

Understand when to end the mentoring relationship. It is healthy to allow the apprentice to continue on without the support of the mentor when they achieve a level of confidence, skill and/or certification. Encourage the apprentice to become certified and mentor others.

Open Door Policy

Establish a corporate Open Door Policy. Encourage employees to share ideas, concerns and success stories with management.

Profile of a Mentor

Industry leaders have established behavioural profiling of successful mentors. Consolidating their Profiles, including learning styles and behavioural attributes has allowed the Industry to establish a benchmark of the characteristics of a successful mentor. This human resource planning tool will allow individuals to compare their own characteristics against the benchmark and identify themselves as potential mentors.

Please click the links below to see common traits of successful mentors.

Common Traits of Successful Mentors

Energy Level – This measures how well the person reacts to time constraints and how quickly they work. A successful mentor is a self-starter, a multi-tasker and is self-motivated.

Assertiveness – This measures confidence and the tendency to take charge of situations. A potential mentor is somewhat willing to lead, diplomatic and has a low need to control others.

Manageability – This measures how well a person responds to authority and a structured environment. A proven mentor is accepts moderate authority but will ask questions when they do not agree.

Attitude – This measures a person’s positive or negative viewpoints about people and outcomes. A would-be mentor is neither skeptical nor too optimistic.

Accomodating – This measures a person’s willingness to consider the needs of all group members and be a good team player. An influential mentor is able to appreciate the occasional need to take a personal position that is different than the group's position.

Independence – This measures how much someone prefers to be supervised or left to work on their own. An effective mentor is moderately independent but can still accept supervision.

Objective Judgment – This measures how often a person uses objective judgment over intuition. A valuable mentor will make objective decisions when given enough information but can make intuitive decisions when necessary.

Potential Remuneration Plans

The Automotive Human Resource Sector Council has prepared a number of pay incentive formulas based on industry practices. These formulas are only suggestions for encouraging and promoting mentoring in the workplace. It is recommended that you customize a pay incentive plan that works best between the company, mentor and apprentice.

Mentor Incentive Plans

Click the link below to see some suggested Mentor Incentive Plans

Mentor Incentive Plans

Flat Rate Unit Formula

Example: For a 10 hour job, 0.5 hour is spent training, apprentice works on the job with the mentor, improving total productivity time by estimated 20%. This returns 20% time/wage back to mentor.

Flat Rate Percentage Formula

Example: For a 10 hour job, 2 hours are spent training or 20%. Add 20% to journeyperson flat rate wage.

Original wage = $100 per repair. New wage rate = $120 per repair.

Hourly Rate Increase for Straight-time technician

Example: $1.50 increase per hour

Quarterly Bonus Option

Example: $500 quarterly bonus

Productivity Unit Incentive

Determine minimum productivity unit for apprentice. For every unit produced over minimum, divide the unit by two and pay both apprentice and mentor at journeyperson wage. If minimum productivity unit is not achieved, mentor pays the difference between the output and the minimum at apprentice wage.

Example: Minimum productivity unit for apprentice is 20 hours per week. Apprentice performs 30 hours in a week. Difference is 10 hours. Divide 10 hours by 2. Pay apprentice and mentor for an additional 5 hours each at journeyperson wage.

Apprentice Incentive Plans

Click the link below to see some suggested Apprentice Incentive Plans

Mentor Incentive Plans

Under the Apprenticeship Training Agreement the Employer is required to follow the wage guidelines determined by the Department of Education.

Apprenticeship Wage Guidelines

Year 1: 2000 hours & 6 modules = 50% of Journeyperson’s wage

Year 2: 2000 hours & 6 modules = 65% of Journeyperson’s wage

Year 3: 2000 hours & 6 modules = 75% of Journeyperson’s wage

Year 4: 2000 hours & 6 modules = 95% of Journeyperson’s wage

Productivity Unit Incentive

Determine minimum productivity unit for apprentice. For every unit produced over minimum, divide unit by two (2) and pay both apprentice and mentor at journeyperson wage. If minimum productivity unit is not achieved, mentor pays the difference between the output and the minimum at apprentice wage.

Example 1: Minimum productivity unit for apprentice is 20 hours per week. Apprentice performs 30 hours in a week. Difference is 10 hours. Divide 10 hours by 2. Pay apprentice and mentor for an additional 5 hours each at journeyperson wage.

Payment During In-School Training

Example: Have apprentice working part-time during in school training (i.e. 20 hours a week). Pay the apprentice for 40 hours a week to offset loss of wages while receiving training. Formalized by a Employment Training Contract.

A Message to the Mentor

Deciding to become a mentor is an important step to take in personal and professional growth. Sharing your knowledge and skills will have a huge impact on industry workforce planning and longevity.

Apprenticeship Mentor Training

The Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Training and Skill Development Division now offers mentorship training for apprentices and employees.

Beginning in 2007, mentoring will be integrated in all Apprenticeship Programs for current and future apprentices. The Workplace Mentoring Course will also be offered as a stand alone course  for experienced employees. Upon completion, the individual will be recognized by Industry and the Apprenticeship Division as a certified mentor.

This course will be available in a variety of formats including on-site corporate training, Internet  training, correspondence and in-class delivery. Contact the Apprenticeship Training and Skill Development Division for more information.

There are new programs out to help employers and employees offset costs associated with training. Click on the links below to find out more.

National Tool Tax Credit

What is the new tradesperson's tools deduction? The new tradesperson's tools deduction provides employed tradespersons with an annual deduction of up to $500 to help cover the cost of new tools necessary to their trade. The deduction applies to the total cost of eligible tools if the following conditions are met:

  • the total cost exceeds $1,000;
  • the purchase was made by an employed tradesperson.

For further details, please click here

National Wage Credit and Apprenticeship Incentive Grant

A new Apprenticeship Job Creation Tax Credit allows eligible employers to receive a tax credit equal to ten (10) percent of the wages paid to qualifying apprentices in the first two years of their contract, to a maximum credit of $2,000 per apprentice per year.

A new Apprenticeship Incentive Grant program will be established effective January 1, 2007. The program will provide a cash grant of $1,000 per year to apprentices in the first two years of an apprenticeship program in one of the Red Seal trades and other economically strategic apprenticeship programs. This grant will be included in computing the income of the recipient for tax purposes.

Mentorship Toolkit

The Mentorship Toolkit educates the employer on the benefits of mentorship and provides a step-by-step guide to launching an in-house mentorship program.

Apprentice Performance Evaluation

The Apprentice Performance Evaluation document is a tool for the mentor to help track the training progress of the apprentice.

Mentor Performance Evaluation

The Mentor Performance Evaluation document is a tool for the apprentice to evaluate the training methods of the mentor.

Sample Training Contract

Employers who wish to define employment and training expectations with their apprentices may use a Training Contract.

Sample Employment Contract

Employers who wish to define employment terms with their hires may use an Employment Contract.

Special Thanks to:

Chebucto Ford 
Wolf Collision
Clayton Park, Canadian Tire
O’Regans Group 
Chad Kennedy Certigard
Colonial Honda 
MacPhee Pontiac 
Hammonds Plains Service Centre 
Yuilles Auto Works 
Bancroft Shell

© 2017 Automotive Human Resource Sector Council of Nova Scotia
Partners: This initiative is funded by the Government of Canada & the Nova Scotia Community College.

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